This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Coin Stories

On this edition of coin stories I want to show you some differences in Engelhard bar varieties.  Sometimes the smallest variation could mean big money.  Here are the 3 we will look at today.  Sorry for the blurry picture but my camera isn’t working with me tonight.

While these 3 bars may look very similar, they are all from different series.  All information provided about these bars are thanks to AllEngelhard.  That site is highly recommended to find out information on a variety of Engelhard, Art Bar and Commemorative bars.  They are the authority when it comes to identifying these bars.

First we will look at the PR Prefix bar.

EI-10 series

This is also known as the EI-10 series.  The Wide ‘E’ and ‘MC’ in Globe Logo is what makes this bar stand out from the others.  It had a mintage of less than 400,000.  Believed to have been produced in 1981. This bar is likely the first portrait variety produced in the United States.  You can see the info from All Engelhard here.

 

FC Bar Series EI-10V

This is a FC Prefix bar.  It’s a EI-10V series and has very little difference than the above bar.  It has a Wide ‘E’ at Top of Globe Logo but no MC stamp.  The mintage was also around 400,000 on this bar.  The thing that makes it special is the fact that many of them were melted down because they were so common.  This gives it a little higher price than the above bar.  Here is a look at the bar and info from All Engelhard.

FP Bar Series EI-09V

While this is the most common bar of the three, it has different varieties within the series.  It had a mintage of over 1.1 Million but some hold more value than others.  It is thought the most rare and highest premium examples include the proof-like finish with frosted logo and reverse stamping variation.  Here is the bar I have.

Engelhard Varieties

These are only a few examples of different bars available.  You can see here some bars that look almost identical have very subtle differences that make them some high dollar bars. With mintages of less than 500 and the other of less than 50, these bars bring a very high premium.  Expect to pay more than $100 USD for 1 ounce bars like this.  Some bringing as much as $1000.  Check out these 2 examples.

I hope you enjoyed this information and some silver from my collection.  If you have any of these bars, All Engelhard is the best place to get info on them. Sorry if I didn’t get back to you on my last article, I’ve been on vacation and then got hit by a big snowstorm.  Thanks for reading and rating my article. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.

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Responses

  1. Zeus69

    Hey VG, very interesting, you seem to be a big collector of various old valuable coins and silver bars, etc.
    Do you perhaps have any minted Kruger coins?
    Thanks for the interesting article.
    Regards,
    Mark (Zeus69)

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    1. VG Post author

      These bars serve many purposes. I like them because they are individually serial numbered and can be “tracked” if stolen, also good for insurance purposes. Some people collect them for low serial numbers or bar rarity. The commons are just a nice store of value. Dansco and Whitman makes nice storage books for them.

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