After my last post I decided to actually find out a bit about blockchain in general and EOS in particular, so I checked out the Wikipedia article and the eos.io website. Naturally I’ll be supplementing this with extensive reading here on Trybe, but Wikipedia and YouTube are still my first stops for basic information. I must admit the concept of a decentralized operating system sounds interesting, and had a look at a couple of YouTube videos on the subject of smart contracts. So being a fairly hands-on person I’ve decided to explore DAPP development. Reading the info on the eos developer portal it seems I need a Linux system, and also to get up to speed in C++.

Well, I’ve been considering a total open-source workflow for my games and graphics work anyway. The hard drives on my Windows laptops are nearly full so I decided it was about time to build a new Linux workstation. I last built a system about 20 years ago, and I must admit it was basically me buying components at a computer swap meet and then watching a couple of friends, who had more experience building systems, put it together for me. This time I bought the components online, had them delivered to work, and a couple of colleagues (who teach students to build systems) put it together for me while I watched. I’m basically a software person.

We had a few issues, mostly related to the sticks of RAM not being seated firmly enough, but once that was resolved there was the inevitable issue of DRIVERS! My mobo was pretty recent, and clearly the version of Linux I was trying to install didn’t have drivers for it. I was going by the recommendation on the eos site as to which version to install, but decided to go with a more recent one just so I could actually see something on the monitor. I even managed to get my GTX 1060 Ti to work properly. I started with Ubuntu but decided to go with Mint because it just looks nicer.

Another problem was internet access. Even new operating systems need to install extra stuff, and some of the apps I wanted weren’t installed by default. Such as a C++ compiler, and decent programmer’s text editor. I didn’t get a wireless network adapter (silly me) so I had to try to connect via a LAN cable attached to a laptop that does have wireless access. Finally got that to work, and I’m typing this on my new machine, all ready to upload to Trybe.

Next, C++. I’ve been working with GDScript in Godot for the past few weeks, but put that aside to get on top of C++. It’s quite a bit different to Java, not so much in the concepts but the implementation. My eventual aim is to set up an eos node and play around with what can be done with it. I guess I’ll get a pretty good understanding of how it all works if I do that. Anyway, at the moment I’m working through a textbook on C++ because it has a lot of exercises to practice, and also I’m trying to get the Java code in one of my favourite books (Head First Object Oriented Analysis and Design) to work in C++. Early days yet but I’ve managed to set up an inventory of guitars for Rick the Guitar Shop guy and add a couple of Guitars to it. I must admit I find implementing the methods of a class in a file that doesn’t have the class in it seems very strange, but then no doubt C++ programmers find Java a bit odd.

I’m still very hazy on how it all fits together. There’s nothing in my text on creating a GUI in C++. Must be an advanced topic. I can create a GUI in Godot, but it doesn’t work all that well with C++, although it can be done I believe. And then there’s deployment to the EOS platform. No doubt all will become clear eventually. I’ll be creating stunning and successful DAPPS before you know it. Yeah, right. Still, should be a lot of fun.

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